Some of Our Favorite Drabbles of 2017

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To celebrate the conclusion of the third calendar year of our existence, we have compiled a list of some our favorite posts of 2017.

While we are grateful to every Drabble reader and writer for helping to make this small corner of the Internet such an unexpected success, we want to recognize a few pieces that accomplished what we were setting out to do when we began this blog almost three years ago. Here (in no particular order) are a few drabbles we truly loved in 2017, enjoy:

Split Custody by Rachel Doherty

This Lady Has Lost Her Way by Robert Krenzel

Butt Dialed by Barry Basden

White Petals by Jade M. Wong

Delete by Bill Diamond

Of Artistic Temperament by Sophie Flynn

Empty Vessels by José Cañusí

Say It with Flowers by Hombrehompson

I Want to be a Crayon Today by czvasser

Spiders Don’t Write Poetry by James Blevins

Where I’m From by Nacklo

 

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Of Artistic Temperament

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editors pick

By Sophie Flynn

I liked it when you said I had an ‘artistic temperament’ because it covered it all: tears in the carpark, not eating for days, refusal to choose paint for the walls because I just couldn’t look at the colors anymore; and instead made those days when I couldn’t cope, when I pictured cutting out my tongue and ripping off my skin, seem part of something greater to create something worthwhile, rather than days indulging myself. My artistic temperament was such a lovely phrase for what was really: unpleasant, unnerving, unbearable or, as you finally put it as you left, unlovable.

Lost Dog

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editors pick

By Holly Day

The parts of my childhood I can remember
are disjointed, unsuited for a house
or a school or a world
made of the stable things I read about
all the time in good books.

I got lost. I am, even now, certain that each new home
won’t be comfortable for long,
clinging to the hope
that we are suitable hosts for each other’s misery. I tell you
home is more than the back seat of a car.
Even leaves separate from trees

before curling up to die.

     
Holly Day’s poetry has recently appeared in Tampa Review, SLAB, and Gargoyle, and her published books include Walking Twin Cities, Music Theory for Dummies, and Ugly Girl.

Butt Dialed

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editors pick

By Barry Basden

An odd thing happened last Saturday. You somehow called my cell. Good that Tess was out shopping. I’ve been lucky that way. I don’t know why you still have me in your phone, though I’m glad you do. I kept saying hello? hello? but all I got back was vague noise.

There seemed to be several people in the room, so I listened awhile. Then I heard you ask Paul what he wanted for lunch. I kept listening because it was really nice to hear your voice again.

When I finally hung up, I didn’t say goodbye this time either.

Delete

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editors pick

By Bill Diamond

During a fitful night, I woke to Stygian darkness. Checking my phone, there was another late-night voicemail. The grief returned. A headache began. I braced myself with strong coffee.

“I’ve been calling for days,” the familiar voice was desiccated and desperate. “I need your help. Why won’t you answer?”

My eyes welled.

“I feel like I’m dying. Just send me a little money, then I’ll go into treatment. This time will be different. Please!”

My finger trembled, and I almost gave in. I sobbed for my lost daughter, and deleted her message.

Crows

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By John Grey

Dress like undertakers,
drop from phone wires
to the roadkill below –
their caw is light on melody,
high on triumph –

ELLA
I still have
the record
she left behind
though I haven’t
seen her in years.

I play it
from time to time,
think of her
now and again.

Do them both together
and I run the risk
of dancing.

JEREMY
Lolls all day
in a beat-up rocker
outside a rusty trailer,
drinking and cackling away.
He has no kids of his own
to ask what he did in the war.
If he did,
they wouldn’t have to ask.

      
Bio: John Grey’s work has recently appeared in Front Range Review, Studio One and Columbia Review. He has work upcoming in Naugatuck River Review, Abyss and Apex and Midwest Quarterly.